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Leslie Scalapino & Kiki SmithThe Animal is in the World like Water in Water

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Library Information & Colophon

Title

The Animal is in the World like Water in Water View record in CONTENTdm

Library Call #

501182928 View Reed library catalog record

colophon

The Animal is in the World Like Water in Water was published by Granary Books in 2010. The title is a phrase by George Bataille from The Theory of Religion. Leslie Scalapino's text was written in response to a series of drawings by Kiki Smith entitled "Woman Being Eaten By Animals." The book was produced by Katherine Kuehn and Steve Clay. Typography by Nina D'Amario. Printed by Justin Israels on Niyoda white paper (63 GSM) using an Epson 3800 printer. The accordion binding structure was designed by Daniel E. KeIrn and Katherine Kuehn and was executed by Daniel E. Kelrn, Kylin Lee, and Leah Purcell at the Wide Awake Garage in Easthampton, Massachusetts. There are 45 copies in the edition of which 30 are for sale.

Biography

Leslie Scalapino

(1944-2010)

Leslie Scalapino passed away on May 28, 2010 in Berkeley, California. Born in Santa Barbara in 1944 and raised in Berkeley, Scalapino received her BA from Reed College in 1966 and her MA from the University of California at Berkeley in 1969. Scalapino's honors include an American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation, two NEA Grants, the Lawrence Lipton Prize, a Zellerbach Grant, and the Poetry Center Award from San Francisco State University. She founded O Books and taught at Mills College, the San Francisco Art Institute, California College of the Arts in San Francisco, UC San Diego, the Naropa Institute, Bard College, and the Otis Art Institute.

Philip Whalen, a close friend of the poet, said of her work: "Scalapino makes everything take place in real time, in the light and air and night where all of us live, everything happening at once."1 Associated with the experimental West Coast Language poets, Scalapino eschewed membership and adherence to a specific group or movement. She authored over thirty works working on many collaborations, blurring the lines between different art forms. Scalapino wrote of her writing, “The self is unraveled as an example in investigating particular historical events, which are potentially infinite. The self is a guinea pig…"2 The Animal is in the World Like Water in Water was one of her last works before her death and was written while she worked on Floats Horse-Floats or Horse-Flows, a work exploring the sounds of words.3

Footnotes

1 Scalapino, Tom. “In Memorium- Leslie Scalpino (1944-2010).” Daily Archive May 2010. Pennsound. Web. 12 June 2010. View website

2 Pohl, R.D. “Scalapino's writing punched a hole in reality” Buffalo News (New York) Online. Web. 9 June 2010. ArtsBeat.

3 Scalapino, Tom. “In Memorium- Leslie Scalpino (1944-2010).” Daily Archive May 2010 Pennsound. Web. 12 June 2010. View website

Kiki Smith

(1954-)

Born in Germany in 1954 and known as one of the foremost artists of her generation, Kiki Smith is primarily known as a sculptor, but has devoted herself to a vast array of mediums such as printmaking, drawing, and bookmaking. She is primarily concerned with topics such as self-portraiture, spirituality, human anatomy, nature, and female iconography.

As succinctly stated by the Greg Kucera Gallery: “Kiki Smith has dedicated her career to an unflinching, tireless, and obsessively demanding investigation of a singular yet vast territory of human experience: the body…at the core of her work is the feeling of looking here and there, experimenting, not to see what looks like great art, but to find what feels like real life.”1 Her work is aimed at exploring human existence and the meeting place of human nature, creations, and nature. She said about her work: “In making work that’s about the body, I’m playing with the indestructibility of human life, where life is this ferocious force that keeps propelling us. At the same time…you can just pierce it and it dies. I’m always playing between these two extremes.”2 Constantly examining our society through a unique lens, Kiki Smith has made vastly important contributions to the field of contemporary art.

Footnotes

1 Kiki Smith. Greg Kucera Gallery. Web. 8 June 2010. View website

2 Weitman, Wendy. Kiki Smith: Prints, Books & Things. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2003, 54.

References and Links

Kiki Smith References & Links

Kiki Smith. Granary Books. Web. 7 June 2010. View website

Kiki Smith. Greg Kucera Gallery. Web. 8 June 2010. View website

Kiki Smith-Biography. The Pace Gallery. Web. 8 June 2010. View website

Lack, Sarah. Kiki Smith- About the Artist. MoMA 2009. Web. 7 June 2010. View website

McCormick, Carlo. Kiki Smith- Interview. Journal of Contemporary Art Online. Web. 8 June 2010. View website

Smith, Kiki. Kiki Smith: unfolding the body, an exhibition of the work on paper. Waltham, Massachusetts: Rose Art Museum, 1992.

Weitman, Wendy. Kiki Smith: Prints, Books & Things. New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2003.

Leslie Scalapino References & Links

Hejinian, Lyn. “Leslie Scalapino Remembered.” 2010 The Academy of American Poets Online. Web. 15 June 2010. View website

“Leslie Scalapino.” 2010 Electronic Poetry Center. Web. May 26 2010. View website

“Leslie Scalapino.” 2010 The Poetry Foundation. Web. 15 June 2010. View website

Pohl, R.D. “Scalapino's writing punched a hole in reality.” Buffalo News (New York) Online, 9 June 2010, Online Edition; ArtsBeat. Web. 12 June 2010. View website

Scalapino, Tom. “In Memorium- Leslie Scalpino (1944-2010).” Daily Archive May 2010. Pennsound. Web. 12 June 2010. View website